TEXT / REVIEW / BIO CONTACT WORKS
 

 

biography
List

bibliography
List

text
Eileen Sommerman SUPRA-CONTINENT
french / english

Liz Munsell French Edges 2012
english

Eileen Sommerman nothingness and somethingness
english

Luissio A.M. Clavijo Photography of the dissident 2009
english

Cécile Hartmann Conférence à Bogotà 2009
french

Pascal Beausse L’Ecume des images 2007
Point Ligne Plan
french / japanese

Paul Ardenne Actionner l’espace 2000
Catalogue Monographique
french / english

review
Hunter and Cook magazine, Nothingless and Somethingless
english
Mediapart, A Dubaï, photographier l'incertain
french
Archistorm, Mirages à Demeure
french
ART 21, Cécile Hartmann, un cahier critique
french
Art Presse, Transits
french
Beaux-Arts Magazine, Dynamique indéterminée
french

 

 



« Life’s main medium is precisely repetition.» (Joseph Brodsky)

Some things help to dodge the redundancy of time. Looking for exceptions is one way to caress repetition, knowing of death and madness. Finite life is only relieved by the utter monotony of infiniteness, inviting a warmer embrace of life’s incurable systems.

(...) Hartmann’s idea of beauty comes from nature -- like Hanne Darboven who perceived the flow of time in nature – so she doesn’t distinguish according to the conventional biases of beautiful. Rather she’s interested in the more awkward joints and mechanics of time and space and their physical manifestations, especially the way change looks. Darboven uses the simple addition of numbers to epic affect, and similarly Hartmann translates nuance through a perceptual and aesthetic algorithm that shows fragility and randomness as a form of beauty. In the series of images called Manifest(2010), she finds in nature little situations that could be either answers or questions. A stone pathway that is coming together or breaking up; a spotlit tangle of branches; the poised remains of a fire. In all shades of grey. Her visual language is precise, especially the large formats, deliberate edges and her determined focus. However she consistently frames the abject (perhaps a sign of the pathos of modernness and certainly a rejection of status quo) and her choice of subjects shows a sincere interest in an ontology of beingness over a taxonomy of beauty. Hartmann’s work is alluring, even when she’s documenting decay and erosion, because the temporality reads as an empathic gesture.

Lament or celebration? Hartmann is working from the politics of nature like a medium herself.

Eileen Sommerman, 2013